Rhythmic Accountability and using a Metranome

Rhythm rules ….Rhythm is at the core of all good music, and the notes that we choose to play are not as important as the groove. Groove is everything. If we break it we may have failed as a musician. This is why we must make best friends with our metronome.

We must always try to use it when practicing, and must understand that it does not teach us to play in time but teaches us how to listen while playing!

Listening to oneself and others when making music is one of the highest priorities when on stage or playing music with other people.

If the student has a hard time staying in the pocket with a metronome, they are not listening and have divided their attention between too many things. A sure sign that what they are working on is too advanced, really demonstrating they are unable to truly listen.

Moving with the metronome is highly recommended. A small twisting motion or slight ‘sway’ is what is required. That way we can embody the groove and concentrate on laying our music down over it.

Feel the grove. Ride it and dance! Do you think rhythm is the most important part of music? Does it hurt you the same way it hurts me when you hear the groove broken?

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I can’t hear music without moving, can’t practice without backing tracks or metronome, which I imagine as drums, can’t listen to music that’s out of time. It’s like nails on a black board. So yep. I agree!

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Asked what he looked for in a drummer, the harmonica player replied, “He should be a metronome with sticks.”

If the rhythm section is in the pocket, everything flows from there. It’s all about the groove.

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:100::100::100:

Yes! Broken pockets make me cry in agony and frustration.

And deep pockets make my cry tears of joy!! :sunglasses:

GREAT post. GREAT advice. 100% spot on.

:100::100::100:

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Toughest part of music for me , theory is a close second. I keep on keeping on.

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